Worth The Ride

By on Feb 16, 2017 in Reviews, Uncategorized | 0 comments

I enjoy sitting in my freezing cold basement listening to music that other people created. Song after song, over and over again, I drag and rewind, drag and move forward, pondering these creations, these sensations. Some people like to ski or snowshoe. I like to sit in my basement a lot. But for some godless reason, the “Sarah and The Wild Versatile” CD that I was given didn’t take when I popped it in the computer to run it. Just spun round-n-round, aiming at nothing. I spit on the disc, shined it on my thigh, loaded it in slowly again. Still nothing. Frustrated, I pocketed the CD then shouted up to my 15 year old daughter who was embedded in her softly lit fortress, doing her teenage thing. “Let’s get coffee, sweet face!” I said when I reached the kitchen. “We’re going for a ride.” Listening to music while driving trumps any other...

“It’s Evolution, Baby!”

By on Jan 11, 2017 in Blog, Reviews | 0 comments

Sounding like he’s singing from the backside of a hand-cranked phonograph, songwriter Walker Smith opens his new record “Great Divide” with a minute-and-half long intro that could easily take place in a dime store record booth somewhere out in the Great Plains. The subtle crooning of Smith rides shotgun to a beautiful ukulele as the singer paints a picture of what might happen if you “turn your back on the folks you know…the faces start to fade.” Basically, ending up alone, “carving out your memories in alabaster stone.” A strong image set by Smith, who, over the past five years has become a true standout in the NH music scene. His voice is butter, just about as smooth as it gets. He works his tail off to be heard. His lyrics, they’re big boy lyrics, fully realized, bursting with intelligence. To date, Smith, who lives in Concord,...

Lesser Known No More

By on Apr 19, 2016 in Reviews | 0 comments

It’s the finger roll that Tristan Omand does on his guitar that gets me every time. Mellowing, atmospheric, a familiar progression laced in a lullaby that keeps his characters always running from something. Usually loneliness. And it’s that loneliness that captivates Omand throughout his recently released new CD, “The Lesser Known Tristan Omand.” “Don’t fool yourself with what you don’t believe,” Omand, a Manchester resident, sings on the opening track, “Welcome to Lonely Lanes,” a tale set inside a desolate bowling alley where more beer is being spilt then pins being dropped. Sad for sure, a “lonely life is just burning, burning.” But the two friends in the song, both mashed up on cheap beer, know that this moment is the best it’s ever going to get for them. So why fight it? Why try fooling anyone? Omand lets it burn into a toothy snarl, that’s what the songwriter does next on...

A Life…Well, Lived.

By on Jan 20, 2016 in Reviews | 0 comments

I gauge a book by how fast I’m reading it. If I’m meandering my way through, plodding along, reading but not digesting and not thinking much about during the day, then it’s a good book. Meh. It won’t enhance my life in the long run. If it’s a book that I’m slowing myself down from finishing, cutting my nighttime reading sessions short so I can chase the rush the next night, then it’s a book I’ll return to again and again. Like Tiger Man, it’s a Winner! Ray Wylie Hubbard, the longtime Americana recording artist from Texas, wrote a memoir like that called, “A Life…Well, Lived.” It’s a fantastic, honest, unique read, this 174 page trip through Ray’s life in and out of music. The book is broken down into three styles of text. One is the lyrics to his songs, which read likes poems. Another looks like posts off Facebook written by E.E. Cummings with a rambling feel to them. The other are...

Walkin’ The White Moon

By on Jun 9, 2015 in Reviews | 0 comments

Walker Smith has a few things going for him, musically. A nearly flawless voice. That’s one. Seemingly effortless in his command, riding a bed of lyrics that arrive only by someone well read. Walker can play guitar, pick in the right spots, create a rhythm, give birth to a song, then deliver it to a crowd like a young Jackson Browne. He’s that good, folks. And he’s got his first CD out called White Moon. Fourteen songs, half of which are perfect for taking it down on a Wednesday night when you can fall backwards and simply drift away. The other half you stand for, then rock and tap, rock and tap. I listened to White Moon back to front, for some reason that’s just how it loaded. So, after hearing the last track first, “Olive’s Lullaby,” I announced to myself that this was the perfect opener. The moaning of steel behind a steady chord allows Walker to “make the wind sound like its...

All Connected

By on May 7, 2015 in Reviews | 2 comments

Like steam rolling off a mug of hot coffee on a perfect May morning, the opening song on Paul Hubert’s new CD won’t just enhance your chances of a successful day. It’ll also make the beans taste that much better. “Fiddle Head Rag” is the first cut off “All Connected” and it’s simply gorgeous. An instrumental performed solo by the retired teacher from Ashland who never seems to be without his pork pie hats. But you can’t noodle around all day (don’t want the coffee getting cold), so Hubert moves on. He gets to singing on “Come By” and it sounds like an invitation to a party, whereas “Get Along Home” is really just a long goodbye. Hurbert is heading home to the “gal he loves so much.” Towards the end of the song I thought of Rick Danko from the Band wiggling back and forth playing the fiddle....